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In Search of the Perfect Entomological Gift

Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade, one of the stuffed animals available for sale in the Bohart Museum of Entomology's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're looking for the perfect "bugly" entomological gift, be sure to stop by the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University...

Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade, one of the stuffed animals available for sale in the Bohart Museum of Entomology's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade, one of the stuffed animals available for sale in the Bohart Museum of Entomology's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Emma Cluff cuddles a tardigrade, one of the stuffed animals available for sale in the Bohart Museum of Entomology's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This humorous mayfly illustration,
This humorous mayfly illustration, "The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings," appears in the 2019 Bohart Museum calendar. That sentence was written by a UC Davis student in Professor Lynn Kimsey's class. The calendar illustrations are all the work of entomologist/artist Karissa Merritt, a UC Davis student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This humorous mayfly illustration, "The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings," appears in the 2019 Bohart Museum calendar. That sentence was written by a UC Davis student in Professor Lynn Kimsey's class. The calendar illustrations are all the work of entomologist/artist Karissa Merritt, a UC Davis student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 13, 2018 at 3:52 PM

Jessica Gillung's Research on Spider Flies: A Tale of Conflict and Uncertainty

Professor Thomas Pape of the Natural History Museum of Denmark and chair of the Council for the International Congresses of Dipterology, presents the top student prize to Jessica Gillung. The next Congress takes place in 2022 in California

When UC Davis doctoral candidate Jessica Gillung, who studies the parasitoid flies commonly known as spider flies, presents...

Professor Thomas Pape of the Natural History Museum of Denmark and chair of the Council for the International Congresses of Dipterology, presents the top student prize to Jessica Gillung. The next Congress takes place in 2022 in California
Professor Thomas Pape of the Natural History Museum of Denmark and chair of the Council for the International Congresses of Dipterology, presents the top student prize to Jessica Gillung. The next Congress takes place in 2022 in California

Professor Thomas Pape of the Natural History Museum of Denmark and chair of the Council for the International Congresses of Dipterology, presents the top student prize to Jessica Gillung. The next Congress takes place in 2022 in California.

UC Davis doctoral student Jessica Gillung interacts with visitors at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student Jessica Gillung interacts with visitors at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Jessica Gillung interacts with visitors at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, December 12, 2018 at 5:00 PM

A Timely Topic and None Too Soon: The Troubling State of Pollinators

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a timely topic--and none too soon! And the University of California, Davis, is a major part of it. Next July: a major...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels (Echium wildpretii) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 11, 2018 at 5:00 PM

The Birds and The Bees--and The Butterflies

Near the presence of a metal bird sculpture, two monarchs meet Sept. 29 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

...Birds do it, bees do it Even educated fleas do it Let's do it, let's fall in love --Cole Porter When Cole Porter wrote...

Near the presence of a metal bird sculpture, two monarchs meet Sept. 29 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Near the presence of a metal bird sculpture, two monarchs meet Sept. 29 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Near the presence of a metal bird sculpture, two monarchs meet Sept. 29 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hi, Ms. Monarch. Here I am. Look at me! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hi, Ms. Monarch. Here I am. Look at me! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hi, Ms. Monarch. Here I am. Look at me! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can I get your attention? Please? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can I get your attention? Please? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can I get your attention? Please? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hello, again. Here I am, over here. Over here! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hello, again. Here I am, over here. Over here! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hello, again. Here I am, over here. Over here!(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 10, 2018 at 5:33 PM

Keep food safe with advice from UC CalFresh

Always be mindful of the time when food is outside a refrigerator or freezer. Typically, it should be no longer than two hours, and just one hour in the summertime, according to UC Cooperative Extension UC CalFresh nutrition program coordinator Elizabeth Lopez in an appearance on the Valley Pubic Television program Valley's Gold. (The food safety segment begins at the 18:30 mark.)

Lopez recommends using an insulated grocery bag with a frozen ice pack for the trip home from the store, and refrigerating leftovers in sealed containers soon after finishing a meal to maintain food safety.

The UC Cooperative Extension nutrition educator also provided cooking tips with program host Ryan Jacobson, the director of the Fresno County Farm Bureau. Lopez noted:

  • Before beginning, wash hands with warm water and soap for 20 seconds.
  • Make sure the food preparation area is clean.
  • Designate certain cutting boards for fruit and vegetables, and others for meat and poultry.
  • Wash fruit and vegetables under cool running water. No detergent is needed. Read the labels on pre-bagged produce. Some are ready to use, some need to be washed.
  • Use a meat thermometer. Cook beef, pork and lamb to an internal temperature of 145 degrees F. Ground meats should be cooked to 160 degrees F. Poultry, whole or ground, should be cooked to 165 degrees F.

For more information, Lopez suggested consumers consult the USDA's Food Safety.gov website or Food Keeper app, available free in the app store.

UC Cooperative Extension UC CalFresh nutrition program coordinator Elizabeth Lopez spoke about food safety on the Valley PBS program 'Valley's Gold.'
Posted on Monday, December 10, 2018 at 9:28 AM

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