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UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance

From the UC Blogosphere...

Meet-n-Greet the Bugs!

It's finals week! Coco McFluffin, a Chaco golden knee tarantula, will be one of the de-stressors at the Meet-n-Greet Bug Show  from noon to 1 p.m., Tuesday, March 19 in the UC Davis LGBTQUIA Resource Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's finals week at the University of California, Davis, and what a great opportunity to take time to de-stress...with...

It's finals week! Coco McFluffin, a Chaco golden knee tarantula, will be one of the de-stressors at the Meet-n-Greet Bug Show  from noon to 1 p.m., Tuesday, March 19 in the UC Davis LGBTQUIA Resource Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's finals week! Coco McFluffin, a Chaco golden knee tarantula, will be one of the de-stressors at the Meet-n-Greet Bug Show from noon to 1 p.m., Tuesday, March 19 in the UC Davis LGBTQUIA Resource Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's finals week! Coco McFluffin, a Chaco golden knee tarantula, will be one of the de-stressors at the Meet-n-Greet Bug Show from noon to 1 p.m., Tuesday, March 19 in the UC Davis LGBTQUIA Resource Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart Museum associate Wade Spencer shows Coco McFluffin to students touring the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology student and Bohart Museum associate Wade Spencer shows Coco McFluffin to students touring the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology student and Bohart Museum associate Wade Spencer shows Coco McFluffin to students touring the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 18, 2019 at 8:01 PM

Bruce Hammock: From ResearchIng Insect Science to Researching Autism and Schizophrenia

UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor at the University of California, Davis, who holds a joint appointment with the...

UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis researchers Jun Yang (right) and Sung Hee Hwang (center) with Bruce Hammock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a photo from the Kenji Hashimoto lab, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Japan, and includes some of the scientists working on the autism/schizophrenia research. In the center, front row, is  Kenji Hashimoto.  First author Ma Min, third from right, back row.  Second author Qian Ren is in the back row,  far right. Researcher Tamaki Ishima is the fourth from right, back row. (Photo courtesy of Kenji Hashimoto lab)
This is a photo from the Kenji Hashimoto lab, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Japan, and includes some of the scientists working on the autism/schizophrenia research. In the center, front row, is Kenji Hashimoto. First author Ma Min, third from right, back row. Second author Qian Ren is in the back row, far right. Researcher Tamaki Ishima is the fourth from right, back row. (Photo courtesy of Kenji Hashimoto lab)

This is a photo from the Kenji Hashimoto lab, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Japan, and includes some of the scientists working on the autism/schizophrenia research. In the center, front row, is Kenji Hashimoto. First author Ma Min, third from right, back row. Second author Qian Ren is in the back row, far right. Researcher Tamaki Ishima is the fourth from right, back row. (Photo courtesy of Kenji Hashimoto lab)

Posted on Monday, March 18, 2019 at 5:22 PM

Mites Biting?

Advice for the Home Gardener from the Help Desk of the
UC Master Gardener Program of Contra Costa County

rat mite (ornithonyssus bacoti)
rat mite (ornithonyssus bacoti)
Client's Request:  Thank you for bringing the unknown biting insect to the UC Master Gardener Program Help Desk.

Help Desk Response:   As I said in our conversation today, your insect is not a bed bug, but rather a mite of some kind. From its appearance, I believe it is a rat mite. There are also bird mites that can invade homes and bite people, but its appearance is closer to the rat mite. 

These mites need rodents to survive, but will come into homes when their preferred hosts die or decrease in number. They cannot survive for too long without their hosts, even though they feed on humans. If there is a large population of rodents (rats or mice) in your attic or crawlspace, you might see a continued presence of these mites. 

Here is a link to information from Contra Costa Vector Control District:  https://www.contracostamosquito.com/mites.htm and from
Alameda County Vector Control about biting mites:
http://acvcsd.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Mites.pdf.

I didn't ask if you had rodent problems in your home, but I would be surprised if you did not (rat infestations are very common in our area). These links below are to information about controlling rats and mice: http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74106.html;
http://ipm.ucanr.edu/QT/housemousecard.html.
More information can also be found on the Vector Control districts.

I hope this information is helpful and you're able to get rid of these pesky biting creatures. Please let us know if you have more questions.

Help Desk of the UC Master Gardener Program of Contra Costa County (SEH)


Note:  UC Master Gardeners Program of Contra Costa's Help Desk is available almost year-round to answer your gardening questions.  Except for a few holidays (e.g., last 2 weeks December), we're open every week, Monday through Thursday for walk-ins from 9:00 am to Noon at 2380 Bisso Lane, Concord, CA 94520. We can also be reached via telephone:  (925) 608-6683, email: ccmg@ucanr.edu, or on the web at http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/Ask_Us/. MGCC Blogs can be found at http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/HortCoCo/ You can also subscribe to the Blog.

 

 

Posted on Monday, March 18, 2019 at 12:08 AM

When Irish Eyes Are Smiling...There Must Be a Green Insect Nearby

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When Irish eyes are smiling, it could be... St. Patrick's Day is approaching or A green insect is nearby  If...

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 15, 2019 at 7:18 PM

Herbs and Vegetables

 

 

Vegetable Garden and Herb Workshop

By Leslie E Stevens   UCCE Master Gardener

 

Now that our county's been blessed with winter rains, it's time to start planning our spring vegetable gardens. But what to plant, when and where?  Is frost still a concern, particularly in the North County? Should seeds be sowed directly in the ground or started indoors? What herbs grow well in pots?

These are just a few of the questions to be addressed before buying those first starts or seed packs.  Answers to these dilemmas, along with tips for growing healthy herbs and vegetables will be covered during this Saturday's free Advice to Grow By workshop presented by the UC Master Gardeners of San Luis Obispo County.

The workshop's three presentations will cover spring vegetables—how to start them, what grows best in the North County versus the South County and common pitfalls; herbs—potting needs, shade versus sun requirements and year-round growing opportunities; and container gardening and grow lights for herbs and veggies.

There also will be plenty of ideas for those looking to try something new.  Ever wondered what impact grow lights might have on seed germination?  Or tried growing herbs on a wall or fence? Or what it means to grow a pot in a pot?

All of these gardening gems will be revealed Saturday, along with a surprise take-home gift.

Informational handouts will be provided at the workshop and audience questions are encouraged following each presentation.

The outdoor workshop runs from 10 a.m. to noon at the Garden of the Seven Sisters, 2156 Sierra Way in San Luis Obispo. Come and join your fellow gardeners under the pergola in the demonstration garden. In case of inclement weather, we will meet in the auditorium across the parking lot from the garden.

For more information about UCCE Master Gardeners or to register for workshops, visit their website at http://ucanr.edu/sites/mgslo/.

 

Posted on Friday, March 15, 2019 at 8:19 AM
  • Author: Leslie E. Stevens
  • Editor: Noni Todd

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