UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance
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UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance

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Growing Hardneck Garlic

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Advice for the Home Gardener from the Help Desk of the
UC Master Gardener Program of Contra Costa County
 
Client's Request:  My sister brought me some heads of hardneck garlic from her harvest in Idaho. I would like to know when is the best time to plant this garlic for this area. I have a fairly large garden area in my back yard in which I currently have tomatoes, eggplant, tomatillos, chiles, and a few weeds all of which are nearly at an end (except the weeds, sigh). I also have some space which I left fallow this summer. It all gets full sun. I appreciate any information you can offer. Thank you,

MGCC Help Desk Response:  Thank you for contacting the UC Master Gardener program with your questions about growing garlic. From your description, it sounds as if you have a good space for growing garlic, as it needs good soil and full sun. October is the ideal time for planting garlic in our area with a harvest expected next June so they should be planted where you won't need the space for your spring planting.

hardneck garlic
However, there is one caveat regarding your sister's hardneck garlic from Idaho. Plant material brought into California is subject to control by the California Department of Food and Agriculture, and should not be imported without permission or inspection. If this garlic was passed by an inspection when your sister entered California, there is no problem. If not, please contact the CDFA to ask about this - here is their contact information. https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/plant/permitsandregs.html. I know this sounds like a lot of fuss for a few heads of garlic, but there are very good reasons for these controls as many serious exotic plant diseases have entered California by such innocent means!

If you would still like to grow garlic, you could use the heads from Idaho in your kitchen and purchase some more for growing in your garden. You can probably still find seed garlic at some local nurseries or online. Suppliers that are out of state but ship to California will have passed inspection, and there are several in-state suppliers.

Here are some UC links with  more information on growing garlic in a home garden: 
https://vric.ucdavis.edu/pdf/garlic.pdf  and http://sonomamg.ucanr.edu/Vegetable_of_the_Month/Garlic/ 

We are not able to recommend any particular business, but some local nurseries may have them still in stock. Also, a Google search 'Suppliers of seed garlic California' brings up a number of Northern California suppliers and some of these websites have great information on growing needs and the different varieties.

I hope this helps, and if you have any further questions please do contact us again.

Help Desk of the UC Master Gardener Program of Contra Costa County (SMW)


Note:  UC Master Gardeners Program of Contra Costa's Help Desk is available almost year-round to answer your gardening questions.  Except for a few holidays (e.g., last 2 weeks December), we're open every week, Monday through Thursday for walk-ins from 9:00 am to Noon at 2380 Bisso Lane, Concord, CA 94520. We can also be reached via telephone:  (925) 608-6683, email: ccmg@ucanr.edu, or on the web at http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/Ask_Us/. MGCC Blogs can be found at http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/HortCoCo/ You can also subscribe to the Blog  (//ucanr.edu/blogs/CCMGBlog/)

Attached Files
hardneck garlic
Posted on Monday, October 22, 2018 at 12:10 AM

Sensors, drones, and CIMIS: UCCE Partners with EarthWatch and CBWCD to Save Water in Urban Landscapes

On Friday UCCE San Bernardino County Master Gardener Coordinator Maggie O'Neill and I hosted a tour that showcased UC ANR Urban Water Use Specialist's Amir Haghverdi's landscape plots at the UCR Citrus Experiment Station. In attendance were CEO Scot Kania and Lead Scientist Mark Chandler from EarthWatch, Becky Rittenburg and Monica Curiel from Chino Basin Water Conservation District, and Darrel Jenerette, UC Riverside Professor of Landscape Ecology.    Our team is implementing an exciting citizen science project measuring water conservation based on implementing 'best practices' in urban landscapes in the greater Los Angeles Basin.   

Amir Haghverdi showing plots to EarthWatch, UCCE and CBWCD teams
Amir Haghverdi showing plots to EarthWatch, UCCE and CBWCD teams

EarthWatch, CBWCD, and UCCE San Bernardino team
EarthWatch, CBWCD, and UCCE San Bernardino team

Posted on Saturday, October 20, 2018 at 8:58 AM

What This Scientist Discovered in an Insect and Why It Matters

A fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, feeding on a banana. (Photo by Sanjay Acharya, courtesy of Wikipedia)

What this scientist discovered in an insect and why it matters... Naoki Yamanaka, an assistant professor at UC Riverside...

A fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, feeding on a banana. (Photo by Sanjay Acharya, courtesy of Wikipedia)
A fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, feeding on a banana. (Photo by Sanjay Acharya, courtesy of Wikipedia)

A fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, feeding on a banana. (Photo by Sanjay Acharya, courtesy of Wikipedia)

Posted on Friday, October 19, 2018 at 4:36 PM

Pollinators on the Beach? Fancy Meeting You Here

A syrphid or hover fly, Eristalis tenax, nectaring on a sea rocket plant, Cakile maritima, on Oct. 18 at Doran Regional Park Beach, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So you're walking along Doran Regional Park Beach in Sonoma County on Tuesday, Oct. 16 and thinking about...

A syrphid or hover fly, Eristalis tenax, nectaring on a sea rocket plant, Cakile maritima, on Oct. 18 at Doran Regional Park Beach, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid or hover fly, Eristalis tenax, nectaring on a sea rocket plant, Cakile maritima, on Oct. 18 at Doran Regional Park Beach, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid or hover fly, Eristalis tenax, nectaring on a sea rocket plant, Cakile maritima, on Oct. 18 at Doran Regional Park Beach, Sonoma. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Along with sand castles and beach balls and beach umbrellas, look for pollinators nectaring on  sea rocket plants at the beach. Note the honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Along with sand castles and beach balls and beach umbrellas, look for pollinators nectaring on sea rocket plants at the beach. Note the honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Along with sand castles and beach balls and beach umbrellas, look for pollinators nectaring on sea rocket plants at the beach. Note the honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Footprints in the sand? Yes, and bees and other pollinators  nectaring on sea rocket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Footprints in the sand? Yes, and bees and other pollinators nectaring on sea rocket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Footprints in the sand? Yes, and bees and other pollinators nectaring on sea rocket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European sea rocket grows in clumps or mounds on sandy beaches along the coastlines of North Africa, western Asia, and North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European sea rocket grows in clumps or mounds on sandy beaches along the coastlines of North Africa, western Asia, and North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European sea rocket grows in clumps or mounds on sandy beaches along the coastlines of North Africa, western Asia, and North America. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 18, 2018 at 4:31 PM

Hungry, Hungry Caterpillars!

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It starts out slow. Beginning in the spring (and sometimes year-around in some locales) Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis...

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2018 at 5:00 PM

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