UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance
University of California
UC Nursery and Floriculture Alliance

From the UC Blogosphere...

Fall Trees

>

 

Planting Fall Trees

By Naomi Klinkenberg   UCCE Master Gardener

 

I heard that planting landscape trees in the Fall is best. Why is that?  Javier O. Nipomo, CA

 

Fall is an excellent time to plant landscape trees.  It's tempting to plant a tree in spring for instant gratification. However, planting in fall when many plants are dormant allows the tree to invest its energies in developing a strong root system instead of developing leaves and fruit. A strong root system is the foundation for a strong, healthy tree. 

 

Deciding what kind of tree to plant will depend on a variety of factors including how much room you have, water and maintenance needs, and your budget. Ask yourself what the intended purpose is for the tree. Do you want shade, summer fruit, or bird-watching?  Keep in mind other factors such as local ordinances. fire hazards and proximity to powerlines and other structures. Select a location that allows enough space for a mature tree; the size the tree will grow to be in 10-15 years from now. Also consider the soil type, optimal sun exposure, and how the roots may affect nearby plantings, hardscapes or other structures.

 

When you have decided on the best location and have a specific tree in mind, visit a reputable local nursery and choose a healthy plant.  Examine the plant before making a purchase. Avoid root-bound potted trees and look for signs of insect pests or disease. Look for healthy bark and a strong central stem or stems. Smaller trees with a full root system are preferable over larger trees with cut root systems. Once you get tree home, proper planting and staking is equally important.

To learn more about trees in the landscape, come to the UC Master Gardeners Advice to Grow by Workshop on Saturday, October 20th, 10 am to 12 noon at 2156 Sierra Way in San Luis Obispo. The workshop will be in the auditorium and seating is limited.    

 

 

 

Attached Files
tree
Posted on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 2:53 PM
  • Author: Naomi Klinkenberg
  • Editor: Noni Todd

International Exposure for Three UC Davis-Affiliated Photographers

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

Images by three UC Davis-affiliated photographers will be among those displayed at the international Insect Salon...

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)
This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)
This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a  honey bee covered with pollen from mustard.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 9:00 AM

"Bamboo" Problems

>

Advice for the Home Gardener from the Help Desk of the
UC Master Gardener Program of the Contra Costa County

MGCC HD Client's Request:
  I live in West County along the Bay. There is a very large patch of “bamboo” that I would like to identify so I can take the appropriate measure to eradicate it. 

I'm calling it a “bamboo” until I know what it actually is. I have heard that it really isn't a bamboo and that it is invasive. It grows 12'-18' tall. The stalks are up to 1.25" diameter. It is so dense and there are a lot of aphids. It is a rhizome bamboo, not the clumping type. It has taken over and is spreading like crazy to the other side of our house.

Below are photos. One photo shows the big patch to the left of our house. The other 2 are close up images.

Arundo donax<br>Giant Reed
Arundo donax
Giant Reed
I understand it is a huge feat to tackle. Would appreciate your advice on how to identify and eradicate it. Thank you,

MGCC HD Response:  Thank you for contacting the UC Master Gardener Program with your questions about the large patch of “bamboo” next to your home. Your guess that it is not actually bamboo is correct, and from the very clear and helpful photos you sent we can identify it as the Giant Reed, Arundo donax. Actually, this plant is easily confused with bamboo as they look quite alike, and can spread and grow large. Bamboo leaves are attached to the stem, or culm  by a short stalk, but your photos show a yellowish collar around the base of the leaf, which is characteristic of the reed. (see photo here https://www.sfei.org/nis/giantreed.html  )

Giant Reed clump
Giant Reed clump
Arundo donax 
is an invasive plant in California. Among other problems, it displaces native vegetation and can be a fire hazard in urban areas. It is native to the Mediterranean area and parts of Asia, and has been cultivated in those parts of the world for various uses, one of which is to produce musical instrument reeds - there is still no good substitute for these reeds! Here is some more information.
https://www.cal-ipc.org/resources/library/publications/ipcw/report8/ 
http://www.santaynezchumash.org/links/arundo_brochure.pdf

It will be quite an undertaking to eradicate this weed, and you will need some good friends to help! 

We have some UC information on dealing with woody weeds, but the size of your infestation seems a little beyond this advice http://ipm.ucanr.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74142.html 

We consulted with a biologist from the Contra Costa Agricultural Commissioner's office, and he was not aware of any programs to assist homeowners with the giant reed. You could begin to mechanically remove the plant material, but there will be re-growth from the stumps, and these would need to be treated with herbicide (see links for details) If you are close to water you would need to use a product approved for such areas. 

Arundo leaf connection
Arundo leaf connection
You may also wish to contact the California Invasive Plant Council, (510) 843-3902 or cal-ipc.org as they might be able to give you more help or advice.

We wish you all the best with this endeavor, please let us know how it turns out.

Help Desk of the UC Master Gardener Program of Contra Costa County (SMW)
*******************
HOrT COCO Editor's Comment:  Unfortunately, this editor is well aware of Giant Reed. It is almost everywhere in the County.  When moving into my bare dirt subdivision house in mid-County 50 years ago, I was scavenging any “free” plants I could find to start my garden. I “found” Giant Reed on a nearby empty lot that I thought was bamboo, dug some up and planted it on my initial hillside garden attempts. Several years later I found that it was Giant Reed from knowledge gained at my job when I observed big projects clearing Giant Reed from channels and creeks. Luckily for me, my hillside wasn't that fertile and I hadn't really watered it, so I started to remove it… still took three years of frequent and hard work to eradicate it. From the pictures submitted above, eradication will be a BIG job for this client.


Note:  UC Master Gardeners Program of Contra Costa's Help Desk is available almost year-round to answer your gardening questions.  Except for a few holidays (e.g., last 2 weeks December), we're open every week, Monday through Thursday for walk-ins from 9:00 am to Noon at 2380 Bisso Lane, Concord, CA 94520. We can also be reached via telephone:  (925) 608-6683, email: ccmg@ucanr.edu, or on the web at http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/Ask_Us/. MGCC Blogs can be found at http://ccmg.ucanr.edu/HortCoCo/ You can also subscribe to the Blog  (//ucanr.edu/blogs/CCMGBlog/)

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 12:16 AM

Oct. 19th Seminar at UC Davis: Do Butterflies Dream of Genetic Tattoos?

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Do butterflies dream of genetic tattoos? That's part of the creative title of a seminar that Arnaud Martin, assistant...

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)
Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Posted on Friday, October 12, 2018 at 5:00 PM

'Honey, I Hardly Know Ya!' The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center Can Change That!

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Honey, I hardly know ya!" The UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center can change that! Want to learn more about the...

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees, the most important pollinators, also produce honey. This image was taken at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2018 at 5:00 PM

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: lroki@ucdavis.edu